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Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 | Licence: All Rights Reserved
Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 | Licence: All Rights Reserved

The Bathing House near the Rosenau

19th century

Heinrich Brückner

From the collection

Title

The Bathing House near the Rosenau

Date

19th century

Description

The bathing house near the Rosenau. Brückner was from a family of painter-decorators, and he himself became a theatrical stage designer and painter. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert acquired a substantial corpus of watercolours by Brückner and his son Max, depicting the landscapes and sights in and around Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, the Duchy of Prince Albert's family. Max Brückner's works tend to be bolder and more painterly in technique than those of his father. The Queen and Prince Consort visited Coburg twice, in 1845 and 1860, and the Queen then returned on a number of occasions following Albert's death in 1861. The Rosenau was the house in which Prince Albert was born. Together, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert mounted many of their watercolour views of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha in three albums, and a surviving typescript list of their contents is presumed to accurately reflect their arrangement. These albums were dismantled around 1930 and many of the watercolours rearranged in the new, topographical, souvenir albums. The first of the albums, from which this watercolour derives, seems to have largely contained watercolours related to the visit of the royal couple in 1845.

Disclaimer

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From the Watercolour World

Location

Schloss Rosenau, Rödental, Germany

Country

Continent

Location Accuracy

Pinpoint

Medium

Credits

Image Credit

Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

Image Licence

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