Courtesy of Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales | Licence: Out of copyright
Courtesy of Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales | Licence: Out of copyright

Item 01: Woolloomooloo House, ca. 1856 / by Conrad Martens

ca. 1856

Conrad Martens

From the collection

Title

Item 01: Woolloomooloo House, ca. 1856 / by Conrad Martens

Date

ca. 1856

Description

Contents: "The view looks south-east, depicting Woolloomooloo House at the head of Woolloomooloo Bay. In the foreground are three female figures watching a fourth, a male, stride towards them. In the background, along a ridge above the house can be seen windmills and possibly Darlinghurst gaol."

Biographical History: Woolloomooloo House was one of the colony’s first permanent residences; it was built on the 100 acre grant given to John Palmer as successful merchant in 1793. In 1822, Palmer sold the estate to Edward Riley. By the late 1840s the estate had been subdivided and terraced houses surrounded the old building. These were let to various local residents such as Archdeacon Thomas Scott and Catholic Archibishop Dr John Polding. The house was finally demolished in the 1850s. Conrad Martens painted several views of Woolloomooloo House in the mid 1850s for members of the Riley family. According to his account books, held by Mitchell Library, at reference: DLMS 143, Martens sold a large work, Old Woolloomooloo House on 1 September 1856 to Captain Riley and on 23 December, another work, The House, (Woolloomooloo) to Charles Riley Esq.

Disclaimer

TWW try to keep the information on this page up to date. However, for the most accurate information you should always consult the owning collection

From the Watercolour World

Location

Wooloomooloo Bay, New South Wales, Australia

Country

Continent

Location Accuracy

Pinpoint

Credits

Copyright

Courtesy of Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales

Image Licence

Spotted an error? Let us know: enquiries@watercolourworld.org

Leave a comment

Do you know more about this painting and the story behind it? Please share your thoughts below.