Courtesy of Musée Carnavalet, Histoire de Paris | Licence: Public Domain
Courtesy of Musée Carnavalet, Histoire de Paris | Licence: Public Domain

L'Hôtel de Ville et le pont d'Arcole en 1842. (Composition rétrospective)

Fédor Hoffbauer

From the collection

Title

L'Hôtel de Ville et le pont d'Arcole en 1842. (Composition rétrospective)

Description

Additional Description: L'Hôtel de Ville en 1842. Seine, activité fluviale, bateau-lavoir, berge, barque, batelier, pêcheur. Hôtel agrandit : deux ailes flanque le vieil hôtel : cour des bureaux au Nord et cour du Préfet au Sud. Immeuble, commerce, café, enseigne : "REMPLACEMENT MILITAIRE" ; "[...]EN GROS . DETAILS", devantures bois, auvent, inscription : "[...] GROS[...] // [...] VINS[...]", drapeau tricolore à l'angle du bâtiment et enseigne. Echafaudage partie Sud de l'hôtel de Ville.

Disclaimer

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From the Watercolour World

Location

Pont d'Arcole, Paris, France

Country

Continent

Location Accuracy

Pinpoint

Tww Comment

The "swing" of 1828 takes the name of Arcole, footbridge replaced in 1854. Hotel enlarged from 1837 to 1842-44, by Godde and Lesueur, rue des Haudriettes, du Martroi, Tourniquet-Saint-Jean and Saint-jean disappear. Place de Grève took the name of the Hôtel de Ville in 1802 and rue Lobau in 1838. Requested from the XVIII century, it was only in 1827 that a royal ordinance authorized the construction of the bridge between the Place de l'Hotel de Ville and the Île de la Cité. Built in 1828 by Marc Séguin, a footbridge was opened to traffic on 21 December of that same year. This suspension bridge is made up of two spans of around 40 m. It is only 3.50 m. wide between the railings and is reserved for pedestrians. The footbridge was first called “Pont de la Grève” during its first two years. It then takes its current name. In 1854, it was replaced by a metallic structure, more solid and allowing the passage of vehicles designed by Nicolas Cadiat and Alphonse Oudry. The Pont d'Arcole was therefore innovative: it was the first bridge without support on the Seine entirely made of iron and no longer of cast iron.

Credits

Collection

Image Credit

Courtesy of Musée Carnavalet, Histoire de Paris

Image Licence

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