Image © The Royal Irish Academy (RIA). Reproduction, publication, transmission or display is prohibited without formal written approval of the Royal Irish Academy. For permission, please contact [email protected] | Licence: All Rights Reserved
Image © The Royal Irish Academy (RIA). Reproduction, publication, transmission or display is prohibited without formal written approval of the Royal Irish Academy. For permission, please contact [email protected] | Licence: All Rights Reserved

View of Baggoths rath [Baggot Rath], a castle half a mile from Dublin [...]

Date

ca. 1780-1800

Collective Title

Rambles through the County of Dublin and some of the neighbouring ones.

Collection

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From the Collection

Description

A view of the ruins of Baggotrath Castle, Dublin; in the right foreground a man sits on a grassy bank looking towards the ruins.
This castle was built in the late thirteenth century and stood on the site of no. 44 Upper Baggot Street, Dublin. It was demolished in the early nineteenth century.
Original Accession: 3 C 32/2

Image Licence

Image Credit

Image © The Royal Irish Academy (RIA). Reproduction, publication, transmission or display is prohibited without formal written approval of the Royal Irish Academy. For permission, please contact [email protected]

From the Watercolour World

Location

Baggotrath Castle, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Medium

Tww Comment

Baggotrath Castle, or Baggotsrath Castle, was a castle situated at present-day Baggot Street in Dublin city centre. It was built in the late thirteenth century by the Bagod (later called Baggot) family, for whom it was named. During the English Civil War, possession of the castle, which was described as "the strongest fortress near Dublin", was a matter of great importance to both sides in the conflict, and it was largely destroyed during the siege of Dublin in 1649, on the eve of the Battle of Rathmines. The ruins of the castle remained on the site until the early nineteenth century when Dublin Corporation demolished what was left of it. No trace of it survives today, but it probably stood at the present-day 44-46 Upper Baggot Street, facing Waterloo Road. (wikepedia)